Filming Options for Presentations

Video Production Services

What’s the best way to film a presentation? Let’s take a look at at the different options available:
From a one-camera setup to multi-camera productions – for the best result, it’s important to choose the right approach.

Presentation Filming in London & UK

Option 1: Presentation Filming with 1 Camera (Close-up or Wide Shot) – no Editing

The most cost-effective solution includes only one camera – either on a close-up of the speaker if he or she is giving a talk without using slides or on a wide shot. If the speaker is moving around a lot, we would frame the shot slightly wider and get a mid shot of the speaker – just so we can be sure that we won’t lose him while walking around.

The camera will typically be positioned in the back of the room.

This option does not include any editing. Once filming is complete, we will clean up the start and end of the talk and add your title and logo.

Audio: We can provide a wireless clip-on lavalier microphone for the speaker or plug into the sound desk if there is an AV system installed in the room.

When there is more than one speaker or you wish to include the presentation as well, we would advise to have a locked off wide shot. But keep in mind that in this case lighting might be tricky. In many cases, you will be forced to compromise as the contrast between the screen and speaker will make it difficult to expose correctly for both. Because the screen is usually much brighter than the presenter, you will either end up with the speaker dimly lit or overexposed presentation slides – which will make them difficult to read. We always try to find the right balance between the two but if this is an issue, a solution could be to bring in an additional light for the speaker.

Pros:

  • most cost-effective option

Cons:

  • only one camera angle (wide shot or close-up of speaker)
  • presentation slides might be difficult to read

Option 2: Presentation Filming with 1 Camera + Screen Recording

As lighting can be issue when filming presentations, getting a screen recording of the presentation might be a feasible option to improve the overall quality of the final video. As with the previous option, we would film your talk with one camera. And again, you will be able to choose between a close-up of the speaker or a wide shot.

If the video isn’t going to be edited professionally, the following solutions are available:

Picture-in-Picture: Presentation Slides with Close-up of Speaker

We can create a picture-in-picture effect, so the viewer can see both, the speaker and the presentation slides at the same time. This works best when the speaker is staying behind a lectern and not moving around.

This approach is ideal for live programming and other live demonstrations.

Pros:

  • cost-effective
  • focus on presentation slides

Cons:

  • works best when speaker is not moving around

Wide Shot with Presentation Slides superimposed

Alternatively, if the shot is locked off on a wide shot, it’s possible to have the presentation slides superimposed. What this basically means is that in this scenario we will add the presentation in post-production and match it to the screen in shot. This way, the shot would be exposed for the speaker but because the presentation slides are replaced in the edit, it will be possible to read them easily.

Keep in mind that on a wide shot you will typically see the audience as well, so if attendance is low or the talk needs to be delivered without an audience present, other approaches to filming might be better suited.

Of course, we can also edit your video and cut back and forth between the slides and the close-up of the speaker.

A combination of having a close-up of the speaker and a wide shot might also be an option if the video is edited. The videographer could then change shot size during the talk and alternate between wide shot and close-up. Sometimes, a slow zoom in or out might work well but if the shot isn’t entirely smooth, it’s often better to “cover it up” in post-production. In this case, the change in shot size would be cut out in the edit and whenever the camera operator changes the framing, we would cut to the presentation slides.

Pros:

  • cost-effective
  • captures the overall atmosphere
  • presentation slides will be easy to read

Cons:

  • no close-up of speaker

Audio: Again, we would ideally get an audio feed from a sound desk if there is a technician on site. Alternatively, we can also mic up speakers ourselves and use wireless clip-on lavalier microphones.

Option 3: Presentation Filming with 2 Cameras (+ Screen Recording)

A very popular option is to have two cameras filming the same talk. The great thing about this is that in most cases having only one camera operator will be sufficient because the second camera is normally locked off on a static wide shot. The main camera will then focus on the speaker. If the speaker is staying behind a lectern, the shot can usually be relatively tight. However, if the speaker tends to move a round quite a lot, our videographers will frame him slightly wider and follow him around on a mid shot by panning with him.

This gives you more options in post-production but it also requires more editing time.

In addition to the two camera angles, it is also possible to have the presentation slides edited into the video.

Audio: Ideally, we will plug into an AV desk and get an audio feed if the venue is equipped with a sound system. Alternatively, we can provide wireless clip-on lavalier microphones for up to two speakers and a handheld microphone for audience questions.

Pros:

  • best value for money
  • captures the overall atmosphere
  • close-up of speaker
  • presentation slides can be edited in

Cons:

  • requires more time in the edit

Option 4: Presentation Filming with 3 Cameras + Screen Recording

Another very popular option is to have three cameras plus screen recording. We would usually have two cameras in the back of the room, one on a wide shot and the other on a close-up of the speaker. The third camera would typically be placed on the side in the front of the room to show the audience. Depending on your budget, this could be a static wide shot but it is also possible to have a second camera operator capturing audience questions and other reactions. Having different camera angles enhances user experience significantly. However, it also increases production cost.

Pros:

  • close-up of speaker
  • captures the overall atmosphere
  • presentation slides edited in
  • audience reaction shot

Cons:

  • most expensive option
  • requires more time in the edit